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Finishing Options

Finishing Options

Harmoniously combining two natural materials is important during many design processes. Polished metal infills paired with timber grown over centuries have the ability to tell a story of quality, sophistication and elegance.

 

Metal surfaces are naturally hardwearing, scratch resistant and can tolerate extreme temperatures. Our extensive research and development into solid surfacing technology can turn your ideas into functional art.

 

Tables within our Molten Collection act as interactive art pieces, with all metals oxidisation and ageing will naturally occur over time. We can limit this process with a variety of wax finishes. We have compiled a list of solid and veneered options with many new techniques being developed all the time.

Metal options

  • Aluminium
  • Brass
  • Bronze
  • Chromium
  • Copper
  • Iron
  • Nickel
  • Stainless Steel
  • Zinc

Capabilities

  • Grain lifting
  • Toughened resin
  • Toughened glass
  • Metals – Brushed, Pitted, Aged, Oxidised
  • Metal edge banding
  • Protective oils – Matt, Satin, High Gloss
  • Bespoke Structures – Carbon Fibre, Flax Fibre, Glass Fibre

Depending on your project different metals offer a wide range of characteristics and properties. For information on these keep reading below, if you have any questions or require more information please get in touch
  • Copper

    • Copper is a soft, malleable, ductile metal with high thermal and electrical conductivity and good resistance to corrosion due to the protective patina that forms on its surfaces. It has low thermal expansion, making it stable and resistant to deterioration from movement.

  • Aluminium

    • Aluminium is a silvery-white, soft, non-magnetic and ductile metal in the boron group. Aluminium is remarkable for its low density and its ability to resist corrosion through the phenomenon of passivation.

  • Brass

    • Brass is an alloy of copper and zinc, in proportions which can be varied to achieve varying mechanical and electrical properties. It is a substitutional alloy: atoms of the two constituents may replace each other within the same crystal structure.

  • Bronze

    • Bronze is an alloy consisting primarily of copper, commonly with about 12–12.5% tin and often with the addition of other metals (such as aluminium, manganese, nickel or zinc) and sometimes non-metals or metalloids such as arsenic, phosphorus or silicon.

  • Iron

    • Pristine and smooth pure iron surfaces are mirror-like silvery-grey. Iron reacts readily with oxygen and water to give brown to black hydrated iron oxides, commonly known as rust.

  • Titanium

    • Titanium is a chemical element with the symbol Ti and atomic number 22. It is a lustrous transition metal with a silver colour, low density, and high strength. … The two most useful properties of the metal are corrosion resistance and strength-to-density ratio, the highest of any metallic element.

  • Nickel

    • Nickel is a silvery-white metal that is used mainly to make stainless steel and other alloys stronger and better able to withstand extreme temperatures and corrosive environments. Nickel was first identified as a unique element in 1751 by Baron Axel Fredrik Cronstedt, a Swedish mineralogist and chemist.

  • Chromium

    • A hard, silvery metal with a blue tinge. Chromium is used to harden steel, to manufacture stainless steel (named as it won’t rust) and to produce several alloys. Chromium plating can be used to give a polished mirror finish to steel.